Beat: PC AZ SJ ACT

Advance Progressive Causes / Arizona / Race, Social Justice, Criminal Justice + LGBTQ / Activists


Allie Barton/Cronkite News
‘This Is a Calling to Me’: Why Bringing More Black Voices to Libraries, Bookstores, and Beyond Matters

The need for better representation has been highlighted by the recent wave of social justice movements across the country. One Saturday morning, a mother and father take their daughter to the public library for the first time.  The young girl walks around her parents to look at the librarian at the front desk, gazing at...

Photo courtesy Arizona Coalition for Change
Black Arizonans Say More Diverse Leadership Has Been a Long Time Coming

Maricopa County not only shifted blue in the 2020 presidential and Senate elections, but it is also edged toward a more diverse leadership.

Maricopa County Sheriff's Deputies watch the crowd during a pro Trump rally from the steps of the Maricopa County Recorder's Office.
Cops Treat Armed Trump Supporters With Kid Gloves While BLM Gets Tear Gassed, Activists Say

Local activists say the differences in handling of racial justice activists and far-right protesters highlight disparities embedded in the system.

Bilal Alobaidi holding his ballot in front of mailboxes
Iraqi Refugee Votes in First US Presidential Election in Phoenix

Bilal Alobaidi came to the US as a refugee in late 2013. While he was able to get a job and exercise other rights, the one thing he couldn’t do was vote.

headshot of Ernesto Todd Mireles
You Can Now Take Free Chicano Studies Courses Online

Arizona once tried to ban ethnic studies in K-12 public schools, but the law was ruled discriminatory and unconstitutional.

four women standing at polling booths
Latina Women in Arizona Expected to Lead Large Voter Turnout in This Election

Latina women in Arizona are expected to lead this large voter turnout based on their historical voting patterns.

headshots of eight young Arizona immigrants
These Young Arizona Immigrants Can’t Vote. But They’re Helping Others Do So This Fall.

A group of undocumented youth are working to get 25,000 people to the polls to vote in the November election — because they can't.