Climate


Ylenia Aguilar member of the Central Arizona Water Conservation District board
Former Undocumented Immigrant Ylenia Aguilar Begins New Role On Central Arizona Water Conservation Board

"Indigenous Mexican people are people of the land, so my connection to the land and my roots has always been there."

cloud seeding
SRP Researches Cloud Seeding in White Mountains to Create Snow Amid Historic Drought

Arizona has been looking to a myriad of solutions to stem its worsening drought, including cloud seeding.

This yard in Mesa was converted to desert landscaping under the city’s Grass-to-Xeriscape incentive program. Photo taken Sept. 7, 2022. (Photo by Samantha Chow/Cronkite News)
As the Drought Grinds on, Valley Homeowners Take Advantage of Xeriscape Incentives

Mesa offers up to $500 for homeowners who replace grass with xeriscape to save water and money.

climate educating communities
Low-Income Communities Learn to Tackle Climate-Fueled Heat

Several nonprofit initiatives have popped up around the country that work to educate and engage residents about climate-fueled heat that disproportionately affects low-income neighborhoods of color.

FILE - In this July 28, 2015, file photo, electricians, Adam Hall, right, and Steven Gabert install solar panels on a roof for Arizona Public Service company in Goodyear, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
How the Inflation Reduction Act Will Help Fight a Big Worry for Arizonans—Climate Change

The Inflation Reduction Act, which President Joe Biden signed on Aug. 16, is the country’s biggest investment in fighting climate change ever. 

Image via Shutterstock
Here’s How the Inflation Reduction Act Will Help Arizona Families

The bill lowers healthcare costs, incentivizes companies to adopt renewable energies and produce clean energy products; provides consumer rebates for those products, and delivers tens of billions of dollars of direct investments to American communities—funded by taxes on billion-dollar corporations. 

FILE - People try to keep cool at the Justa Center, a resource center catering to the older homeless population, as temperatures hit 110-degrees, July 19, 2022, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
From Heat Deaths to Worsening Allergies, Climate Change Harms Health

From 2030 to 2050, according to the WHO, 250,000 additional deaths are expected each year worldwide because of climate-driven health problems.