Photo by Eva Rinaldi Photo by Eva Rinaldi

A unanimous vote in favor of an ordinance designed to curb the filming of crime scenes has received an outpouring of criticism online.

Rapper and actor Ice Cube wants Tucson officials to revisit the city’s new ordinance regarding the filming of crime scenes.

On Sunday, Ice Cube replied to a tweet from Tucson Mayor Regina Romero asking her to “Please make sure its pro-people and not pro-Law Enforcement.” 

The ordinance in question, Ordinance 11746, was unanimously adopted by the Tucson City Council on April 21. It makes filming a crime scene a possible misdemeanor where violators may face four months in jail plus a $750 fine. Nevertheless, the ordinance does not prohibit the filming of police activity.

In his tweet, Ice Cube went on to say, “Y’all should have an emergency meeting to make sure you’re satisfying the great citizens of Tucson and surrounding areas. I love it there I’d hate to miss it.”

He’s scheduled to perform in Tucson at Casino del Sol on September 1.

Ice Cube has been a longtime social justice advocate. He was famously in the rap group NWA from 1987 to 1991 that performed the now-notorious song “F–ck the Police.”

In a June 6 tweet, Mayor Romero made it clear that the ordinance explicitly recognizes that “the public has a clear right to free speech and to record police activities that take place in public.” 

The ordinance comes after The Arizona Daily Star reports a network of people who call themselves “First Amendment auditors” who claim they’re protecting the public’s right to monitor government activities by recording the scenes.

On June 8, Mayor Romero released a statement regarding Ordinance 11746 that read, in part, that she had requested further discussion during their next study session “after hearing feedback from members of the community and seeing misinformation.”

The statement reveals there have been no arrests under this ordinance since its adoption in April. It also reiterates that it does not prohibit members of the public from recording police or crime scenes.