President elect Joe Biden and Vice President elect Kamala Harris deliver their victory speeches in Wilmington, Delaware, on Saturday, Nov. 7.
President elect Joe Biden and Vice President elect Kamala Harris deliver their victory speeches in Wilmington, Delaware, on Saturday, Nov. 7. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

In case you were out celebrating on Saturday and missed Biden and Harris speak, we’ve got you covered.

President-elect Joe Biden addressed the nation Saturday night for the first time since he was projected the winner. The call for unity could not have been more clear.

“The people of this nation have spoken. They have delivered us a clear victory, a convincing victory, a victory for ‘we the people’,” Biden said to a crowd at an outdoor event in Wilmington, Delaware, his home state.

Most major news outlets projected that Biden would win Pennsylvania, a battleground state, pushing him over the 270 electoral college votes needed to unseat incumbent President Donald Trump and take the White House. That news was enough to send thousands of Americans into the streets to celebrate all day long and into the night on Saturday.

During his speech, though, Biden stressed that he would be “a president for all Americans,” doubling down on one of his major campaign themes, and offering a stark contrast to the divisive rhetoric of the Trump administration.

“For all those of you who voted for President Trump, I understand the disappointment tonight,” Biden told the crowd of cheering and horn-honking supporters. “I’ve lost a couple of times myself. But now, let’s give each other a chance…and to make progress we have to stop seeing treating our opponents as our enemies.”

Before Biden took the stage, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris—the first woman, Black American, and South Asian American elected vice president—thanked voters for turning out in record numbers. She paid particular attention to spotlighting the contributions of Black women to the Biden-Harris victory. 

Harris noted that Black women are “too often overlooked, but so often prove that they are the backbone of our democracy.”

The vice president-elect honored women’s suffragists—the color associated with the struggle to give women the right to vote. She also noted that she sees her historic win as only the beginning.

“What a testament it is to Joe’s character, that he had the audacity to break one of the most substantial barriers that exist in our country and select a woman as his vice president,” Harris said. “But while I may be the first woman in this office, I will not be the last.”