Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons
Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

The process of canvassing the votes is primarily symbolic but could open the door for a challenge from the Trump Campaign.

Arizona election officials gathered Monday morning to certify the results of the 2020 election. 

With the official canvass of the Nov. 3 general election in the books, the state’s 11 Electoral College votes go to Democratic President-elect Joe Biden. It also marks the legalization of recreational marijuana, the passing of a proposition focused on improving funding for education, and the election of Democratic Sen.-elect Mark Kelly. The ceremonial signing also cemented multiple federal, statewide, legislative, and other races across the state. 

Kelly will be sworn-in on Wednesday—a full month before the rest of the Senate—as he takes the seat of former Republican Sen. Martha McSally, who was appointed to fill the vacancy left by the late US Sen. John Mccain. He’ll serve the remaining two years of McCain’s six-year term and will be up for election in 2022.

“That [the signed results] will be hand-delivered to the Secretary of the United States Senate so that Arizona’s newest senator can be sworn into office as swiftly as possible,” Gov. Doug Ducey said. 

Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs is responsible for certifying the results, which is mostly a symbolic process. Ducey, State Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert Brutinel, and Attorney General Mark Brnovich served as witnesses.

While the process itself is relatively inconsequential, it now opens the door to a five-day period where anyone can contest the election results. This is especially notable in an election marked by  President Donald Trump and members of the Republican Party’s repeated insistence—without evidence—that the election was wrought with fraud. 

Just a few miles away, multiple state Republicans held a legislative hearing at the Hyatt Regency hotel in downtown Phoenix to decry the results of the elections. However, they did not provide any evidence of their claims. 

“Every Arizona voter has my thanks, and should know that they can stand proud that this election was conducted with transparency accuracy and fairness in accordance with Arizona’s laws and elections procedures, despite numerous unfounded claims to the contrary,” Hobbs said during the brief canvass. 

With the certification done, the next step will be on Dec. 14 when the presidential electors for each state and the District of Columbia gather to formally cast their vote.